Depression2019-08-01T17:18:53+00:00

Christian Counseling for Depression

If you find yourself wanting to stay in bed all day, or feeling a general sense of sadness for reasons you can’t identify, you may be depressed. If you feel yourself slumping into a dark mood that you can’t seem to shake, you may be depressed. The best thing to do is call a counselor today, who can help you identify your symptoms and determine the best course of action.

Learn how to manage the symptoms that accompany Depression
by reaching out to one of our Christian counselors at
(425) 329-4464

Risk-Free Initial Appointment

If you find yourself wanting to stay in bed all day, or feeling a general sense of sadness for reasons you can’t identify, you may be depressed. If you feel yourself slumping into a dark mood that you can’t seem to shake, you may be depressed. The best thing to do is call a counselor today, who can help you identify your symptoms and determine the best course of action. Don’t waste any time getting your life back.

Genetics often play a role in a person’s susceptability to depression. If a parent or other close relative suffered from depression, it is possible the trait could have been passed along to you. Traumatic life events can be the cause of depression, such as the death of a loved one, abuse, financial problems, or any other form of extreme stress. Hormonal changes can also be a cause. Depression has many triggers, not all of which are the same for every person. When it comes to types of depression, there are three. Major depression affects our ability to sleep, eat, work or play. Dysthmia is the second type of depression, which is less severe, resulting in a general malaise and unhappiness but is not paralyzing of one’s ability to function. Bi-polar disorder is the third form of depression, which is characterized by large swings in one’s mood.

There is no doubt that depression can take a toll on a person’s relationships. Communication is often strained in the midst of a bout with depression, resulting in reduced connectivity between the depressed and those wanting to help. It’s important to not let the affect of the depression on a person’s mood or general attitude be a reflection to you of their true self. Your unwavering support will do much good, whether or not you feel appreciated by the person as they make their way through their feelings.

Depression is an isolating condition—both those who suffer from depression and those who care about a sufferer find themselves cut off from the ones they love. Navigating relationships through the trials of depression can be difficult, but it is essential for the sufferer to maintain a supportive network of family and friends. Healthy and compassionate communication between the sufferer and their loved ones can play a crucial role in the process of recovery.